Donald Trump names hostage negotiator O'Brien national security advisor

Thursday September 19 2019

 


Milan clubs meet city officials over plans to demolish San Siro

Wednesday September 18 2019

 

AFP
By AFP
More by this Author

Milan. Milan mayor Giuseppe Sala repeated his vehement opposition to the demolition of the San Siro Stadium, ahead of a meeting Wednesday with the city's two clubs to discuss the future of the iconic stadium.

AC Milan and Inter Milan, who share the stadium to the west of the city, have launched their bid to knock down the San Siro and build a new 60,000-capacity home on the same site.

"For me, San Siro is the history of football, it is a monument of Milan and therefore from here we should start again," Sala wrote on Facebook.

"Thanks to the explanations of Milan and Inter, which appeared today in some newspapers, it is finally evident to everyone that it is not the municipal administration that wants to give up the San Siro, it is the football clubs that intend to build a new stadium, more functional to their needs."

City authorities will meet with representatives from both clubs on Wednesday as part of an in-depth study on the project.

The clubs want to build a new ground adjacent to the current San Siro, while the old stadium will make way for an area "dedicated to sports, entertainment, and shopping".

Advertisement

The project would require an investment of 1.2 billion euros ($1.34 billion), the clubs estimate.

Sala has said the current ground, which is owned by the city, would still be standing to mark the stadium's centenary in 2026 as it was included in the Milan-Cortina d'Ampezzo bid for that year's Winter Olympics as site of the opening ceremony.


Russia, Iran blame US for regional tensions

Monday September 2 2019

 

AFP
By AFP
More by this Author


South Africa's President Ramaphosa pledges to tackle violence against women

Wednesday September 18 2019

 

By AFP


Nigerian police hold suspect after 8 women killed in hotels

Wednesday September 18 2019


Ivory Coast arrests 12 in DJ Arafat tomb desecration probe

Monday September 2 2019

 

AFP
By AFP
More by this Author


Japan Prime Minister warns Africa about debt as China grows presence

Thursday August 29 2019

 

AFP
By AFP
More by this Author


China tells US diplomats in Hong Kong to stop interfering

Thursday August 8 2019

AFP
By AFP
More by this Author


Iran says US Gulf mission will 'increase insecurity'

Thursday August 8 2019

AFP
By AFP
More by this Author


Indian boy, seven, found with 526 teeth inside his mouth

Friday August 2 2019

 

Delhi. A seven-year-old boy who had suffered occasional toothache was found to have 526 teeth inside his jaw, according to surgeons in India, reports The Guardian.

The hundreds of teeth were found inside a sac that was nestled in the molar region of his lower jaw, following surgery carried out at the Saveetha dental college and hospital in Chennai.

“The teeth were of variable sizes that ranged from smallest at 0.1mm to largest 3mm. They had a small crown, enamel and a small root,” said Pratibha Ramani, the head of the department of oral and maxillofacial pathology at the hospital.

 Doctors arrange tooth-like structures removed from the mouth of a 7-year-old boy inside a hospital in Chennai, India.

 “We had to drill down into the top [of the lower jaw], make a window and remove the sac,” said Ramani. “As it [the sac] was going deeper into the tissue the size of the teeth was becoming very small.”

Despite the large number of teeth inside his mouth, the boy was not in too much pain, she said. “The only thing which was bothering him was that the tooth on that side had not erupted, it was empty, and [he had] occasional pain, and there was slight swelling that was increasing in size.”

Advertisement

The boy suffered from compound composite odontoma, a benign tumour. It is not known whether the condition was caused by genetic or environmental factors, she added.

The condition is very rare, though in 2014, doctors in Mumbai extracted 232 teeth from the mouth of a 17-year-old boy following a seven-hour operation.

 A 7-year-old boy, whose tooth-like structures were removed from his mouth, sits inside a hospital in Chennai, India.

The surgery in Chennai lasted about two hours, but it took experts 10 days to analyse all of the teeth. They are hoping to study them further by carrying out genetic tests.

“We had to take a lot of counselling sessions with him for him to undergo surgery. We have very good counselling teams who have expertise in dealing with children,” said Ramani.

The boy, who now has 21 teeth, was discharged after three days and is doing well.

Source: The Guardian


From restrictions to reforms: Saudi treatment of women

Friday August 2 2019

 

Riyadh. Saudi Arabia has decided to allow adult women to travel without seeking approval from a so-called male "guardian", a flagship reform as the petro-state seeks to overhaul its ultra-conservative image

But a number of policies remain in place which leave male relatives in charge of major decisions affecting women's lives.

Here is where the Sunni Muslim kingdom stands on five key issues:

Education

Saudi Arabia's so-called guardianship system places the legal and personal affairs of women in the hands of their fathers, brothers, husbands and even sons.

Women require the formal permission of their closest male relative to enrol in classes at home or to leave the country for classes abroad. It was unclear whether Thursday's reform would change that.

Advertisement

In July 2017, Saudi Arabia's education ministry announced girls' schools would begin to offer physical education classes for the first time, provided they conform with Islamic law.

The ministry did not specify whether girls would need permission from their guardians to take part.

Saudi Arabia has several women-only universities.

Employment

Restrictions the guardianship system has long imposed on women's employment have been loosened as Saudi Arabia tries to wean itself from its dependence on oil.

The reforms announced Thursday also cover employment regulations that are expected to further expand job opportunities for women.

Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman, named heir to the throne in June 2017, has promoted an economic plan known as "Vision 2030", which aims to boost the female quota in the workplace from 22 to 30 percent by 2030.

King Salman, his father, has signed decrees allowing women to apply online for their own business licences. The Saudi police force now also employs female officers.

Driving

On June 24 last year, women were allowed to drive cars for the first time in the kingdom's history.

While the end of the driving ban was largely welcomed, it did not signal an opening up of political freedoms.

Several women's rights activists, including veteran campaigners for the right to drive, were detained just weeks earlier and later put on trial on a host of charges including speaking to foreign journalists.

Personal status

Under the guardianship system, women of all ages require the consent of their male guardian to get married.

A man may divorce his wife without her consent.

In January, the Saudi justice ministry said courts were required to notify women by text message that their marriages had been terminated, a measure apparently aimed at ending cases of men getting a divorce without informing their partners.

Public spaces 

In January 2018, women were allowed into a special section in select sports stadiums for the first time. They had previously been banned from attending sporting events.

Saudi Arabia has also reined in its infamous morality police, which for decades had patrolled the streets on the lookout for women with uncovered hair or bright nail polish.

Some women in the capital, Riyadh, and other cities now appear in public without headscarves.

 


Swedish owner of tanker seized by Iran says crew 'safe'

Wednesday July 24 2019

AFP
By AFP
More by this Author


California bans discrimination against afros and dreadlocks

Thursday July 4 2019

 

AFP
By AFP
More by this Author


China says US tariffs must be lifted for trade deal

Thursday July 4 2019

AFP
By AFP
More by this Author


Iran to bypass uranium enrichment maximum despite calls for rethink

Thursday July 4 2019

 

AFP
By AFP
More by this Author


Frank Lampard appointed new Chelsea Manager

Thursday July 4 2019

 

By Agencies


Netherlands to play USA at Women’s World Cup final

Thursday July 4 2019

AFP
By AFP
More by this Author


Disaster: 14 crew killed in fire on Russian sub

Wednesday July 3 2019

 

AFP
By AFP
More by this Author


Princess Haya: Dubai ruler's wife in UK 'in fear of her life'

Wednesday July 3 2019

 

By The BBC


Sudan in revolt is deja-vu for Egyptians driven out by repression

Wednesday July 3 2019

AFP
By AFP
More by this Author


Inspired Sharma is India's World Cup heartbeat

Wednesday July 3 2019


No 'power vacuum' in Tunisia despite president's illness

Friday June 28 2019

 

AFP
By AFP
More by this Author


Selfies and the self: what they say about us and society

Thursday June 27 2019

 


Iran plays down threat of new US sanctions

Monday June 24 2019

Tehran. Iran on Monday played down the threat of new US sanctions as Washington was expected to tighten punitive measures on Tehran in a standoff sparked by the US withdrawal from a nuclear deal.

Tensions have flared after Iranian forces shot down a US drone Thursday, the latest in a series of incidents including attacks on tankers in sensitive Gulf waters that have raised fears of an unintended slide towards conflict.

Both the US and Iran have repeatedly said they want to avoid going to war, but the spiralling tensions saw US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo travel Monday to meet with Saudi leaders to build a "global coalition" against the Islamic republic.

Tehran says the drone violated Iranian airspace and Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif has backed the claim with maps and coordinates -- allegations dismissed by Washington.

US President Donald Trump claimed he called off a planned retaliatory military strike on Iran at the last minute, tweeting that Washington would instead place "major additional sanctions on Iran on Monday".

"Are there really any sanctions left that the United States has not imposed on our country recently or in the past 40 years?" Iran's foreign ministry spokesman Abbas Mousavi said at a Monday press conference in Tehran.

Advertisement

"We really do not know what (the new sanctions) are and what they want to target anymore, and also do not consider them to have any impact," he added.

Last year, Trump unilaterally pulled the US out of a landmark 2015 deal meant to curb Iran's nuclear programme in exchange for sanctions relief.

The US has since imposed a robust slate of punitive sanctions on Tehran designed to choke off Iranian oil sales and cripple its economy -- which he now plans to expand.

Trump, who has waged a "maximum pressure" campaign against Iran, has also said the US is prepared to negotiate with the Islamic republic with "no preconditions".

"America's claim of readiness for unconditional negotiation is not acceptable with the continuation of threats and sanctions," Hesamodin Ashna, an advisor to Iran's President Hassan Rouhani, said Monday on Twitter.

"We consider war and sanctions to be two sides of the same coin," he added.

- 'Global coalition' -

Pompeo met Saudi King Salman and Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman in the Red Sea city of Jeddah and was later due to hold talks in the United Arab Emirates, US officials said.

Saudi and Emirati leaders both advocate a tough US approach against common foe Iran.

Pompeo described Saudi Arabia and the UAE as "two great allies in the challenge that Iran presents".

"We'll be talking with them about how to make sure that we are all strategically aligned and how we can build out a global coalition," Pompeo said.

He said the US sought a coalition "not only throughout the Gulf states but in Asia and in Europe that understands this challenge and that is prepared to push back against the world's largest state sponsor of terror".

But on Monday Russia, one of the world powers that negotiated the nuclear deal with Iran, denounced the planned new sanctions as "illegal".

- Cyber attack -

US media reports said Trump ordered a retaliatory cyber attack against Iranian missile control systems and a spy network after the drone was shot down.

On Monday Iranian Telecommunications Minister Mohammad Javad Azari Jahromi said no cyber attack against his country had ever succeeded.

"The media are asking about the veracity of the alleged cyber attack against Iran. No successful attack has been carried out by them, although they are making a lot of effort," he said on Twitter.

He acknowledged that Iran has "been facing cyber terrorism -- such as Stuxnet -- and unilateralism -- such as sanctions", naming a virus believed to have been engineered by Israel and the US to damage nuclear facilities in Iran.

With the US out of the deal, Iran has said it would reduce some of its nuclear commitments unless the remaining partners -- Britain, China, France, Germany and Russia -- help it circumvent US sanctions and sell its oil.

Thierry Coville, an Iran expert at the French Institute of International and Strategic Affairs (IRIS), also questioned whether there was room for further US action as previous sanctions have already severely hit Iranian crude exports.

"The Americans are asphyxiating Iran economically in order to force them to hold talks with them," Coville said.

"What more can be done? They will no doubt tighten secondary sanctions... and most probably extend a list of Iranian firms banned from trade."


Michael Jackson fans defiant as abuse claims loom over anniversary

Monday June 24 2019

 


US blocks more Chinese tech firms on national security concerns

Saturday June 22 2019

 

AFP
By AFP
More by this Author


Plane grounded in South Africa after foetus is found on board

Friday June 21 2019

 

AFP
By AFP
More by this Author


Virtual Facebook currency faces real-world resistance

Friday June 21 2019

 


Stars turn up and viewers tune in, but VAR steals headlines at women's World Cup

Friday June 21 2019

AFP
By AFP
More by this Author


New evidence suggests crown prince is liable of Jamal Khashoggi’s murder, UN investigator reveals

Wednesday June 19 2019

 


France has lowest levels of trust in vaccines globally: Survey

Wednesday June 19 2019

 


Saudi Arabia de-fangs religious police but plans to enforce 'decency'

Wednesday June 19 2019


Swiss women rise up for equal pay

Friday June 14 2019

 


Saudi entertainment officials open probe into Halal 'nightclub opening'

Friday June 14 2019

 

By ALJAZEERA


First US murder trial using DNA, family tree evidence

Friday June 14 2019

AFP
By AFP
More by this Author


Trump’s spokeswoman Sarah Sanders quits

Friday June 14 2019

 


Halal Night Club opens in conservative Saudi Arabia

Thursday June 13 2019

 


WorldRemit launches business payments service

Thursday June 13 2019

 

By Business Daily


Russia's 'sexiest poker player' is found dead in her bathroom

Thursday June 13 2019

 


Humans consume a credit card's worth of plastic every week- study

Wednesday June 12 2019

 

London. People worldwide could be ingesting five grammes of microscopic plastic particles every week, equivalent in weight to a credit card, researchers said Wednesday.

Coming mostly from tap and especially bottled water, nearly invisible bits of polymer were also found in shellfish, beer and salt, scientists and the University of Newcastle in Australia reported.

The findings, drawn from 52 peer-reviewed studies, are the first to estimate the sheer weight of plastics consumed by individual humans: about 250 grammes, or half-a-pound, over the course of a year.

Another study calculated that the average American eats and drinks in about 45,000 plastics particles smaller than 130 microns annually, while breathing in roughly the same number.

"Not only are plastics polluting our oceans and waterways and killing marine life, it's in all of us," said Marco Lambertini, director general of WWF International, which commissioned the new report.

"If we don't want it in our bodies, we need to stop the millions of tons of plastic that continue leaking into Nature every year."

Advertisement

- Plastics industry set to grow -

In the last two decades, the world has produced as much plastic as during the rest of history, and the industry is set to grow by four percent a year until 2025, according to a new report by Grand View Research.

More than 75 percent of all plastics winds up as waste.

A third of that -- some 100 million tonnes -- is dumped or leaches into Nature, polluting land, rivers and the sea.
On current trends, the ocean will contain one metric tonne of plastic for every three metric tonnes of fish by 2025, according to The New Plastics Economy report, published by the Ellen MacArthur Foundation.

Plastic particles have recently been found inside fish in the deepest recesses of the ocean, and blanketing the most pristine snows in the Pyrenees mountains between France and Spain.

The authors of Wednesday's report were up front about the limitations of their research, starting with the fact that little is known about health consequences.

- 'Zero plastics' -

Gaps in data were filled with assumptions and extrapolations that could be challenged, though the estimates, they insisted, were on the conservative side.

They invited other researchers to build on their conclusions.

"Developing a method of transforming counts of microplastic particles into masses will help determine the potential toxicological risks for humans," said co-author Thava Palanisami, a microplastics expert at the University of Newcastle.

Some experts remain sceptical about longterm impacts.

"Based on the evidence that is currently available, I do not think that health effects of microplastics are a major concern," Alastair Grant, a professor of ecology at the University of East Anglia told AFP.

But that doesn't mean plastics isn't a major problem, he added.

"What we do need is political and economic actions to reduce the amounts of plastic being disposed of into the environment and encourage recycling."

Media and watchdog reports have recently uncovered numerous cases of plastic waste from rich countries destined for recycling in poorer ones being dumped or burned instead.

"This is likely to have much more serious health effects than a rather small number of plastic particles in food and water," Grant said.

The WWF said only hard targets backed by binding national commitments could hope to stem the plastics tide.

"The global goal must be to reduce plastic leakage into nature to zero," Eirik Lindebjerg, WWF's global plastics policy manager, told AFP.

"We need a new, legally binding agreement to combat marine plastic pollution -- it should be a stand-alone treaty like the Montreal Protocol or the Paris Agreement."

"Zero plastics" does not mean no plastics used..

But waste must be folded back into a circular economy, and plastics should no longer be made from fossil fuels, Lindebjerg added


Over three million people have fled Venezuela crisis: UN

Friday June 7 2019

 

AFP
By AFP
More by this Author


British Premier quits as party leader, succession race kicks off

Friday June 7 2019

 

AFP
By AFP
More by this Author


Theresa May: a legacy sunk by Brexit

Friday June 7 2019

 

AFP
By AFP
More by this Author


Where Theresa May went wrong

Friday June 7 2019

 

AFP
By AFP
More by this Author


Nigeria shuts private TV, radio close to opposition

Friday June 7 2019

Raymond Dokpesi, owner of the two stations,

Raymond Dokpesi, owner of the two stations, says his media operations were being targetted in a crackdown (AFP Photo/OPTIONAL,M) 

AFP
By AFP
More by this Author


Liberia's Weah faces key test with protests over economy

Friday June 7 2019

 


Ravages of time on an African cocoa plantation

Friday June 7 2019

 

AFP
By AFP
More by this Author


Putin says Russia is prepared to drop START treaty

Thursday June 6 2019

 


US ambassador flees teargas at Malawi election protest

Thursday June 6 2019

 

AFP
By AFP
More by this Author


Africa at a glance

Thursday June 6 2019

By AFRICAREVIEW.COM


Japan minister says high heels at work are 'necessary'

Thursday June 6 2019

 


Russia, China agree to upgrade relations for a new era

Thursday June 6 2019

 


Global economy the losers in US-China trade war, says IMF

Thursday June 6 2019

By Agencies


How apps, social media is fueling 'booming' online prostitution

Wednesday June 5 2019

 

AFP Agency
By AFP Agency
More by this Author


Empire State of Mind: Jay-Z becomes hip-hop's first billionaire

Tuesday June 4 2019

 

AFP Agency
By AFP Agency
More by this Author


Dutchman held by IS-linked rebels killed in Philippines

Friday May 31 2019

 

AFP
By AFP
More by this Author


North Korea 'executed' officials by firing squad after failed Trump summit: report

Friday May 31 2019

 

AFP
By AFP
More by this Author


US to hit Mexico with tariffs over 'illegal migrants'

Friday May 31 2019

 

AFP
By AFP
More by this Author


Modi plots course after landslide Indian election win

Friday May 24 2019

 

AFP
By AFP
More by this Author


US air strikes may be spurring Al-Shabaab attacks in Mogadishu

Friday May 24 2019

By KEVIN J. KELLEY


Shock as three more die on overcrowded Mt Everest

Friday May 24 2019

 


Fierce divide as Botswana lifts Elephant hunting ban

Friday May 24 2019

 

AFP
By AFP
More by this Author


US charges Julian Assange with violating Espionage Act

Friday May 24 2019

AFP Agency
By AFP Agency
More by this Author


Breaking News: British Prime Minister Theresa May announces her resignation

Friday May 24 2019

 


India has ended Iranian oil imports: envoy

Friday May 24 2019


Modi earns global praise for landslide win in Indian election

Thursday May 23 2019

 


Modi claims India poll victory, vows 'inclusive' future

Thursday May 23 2019

 


May stares at defeat in final Brexit gambit

Thursday May 23 2019

 


Qatar World Cup to be played with 32 teams: FIFA

Thursday May 23 2019

 

AFP Agency
By AFP Agency
More by this Author


French families sue Boeing over Ethiopian Airlines

Wednesday May 22 2019

 

AFP Agency
By AFP Agency
More by this Author


Boy or girl? Hong Kong at centre of banned China gender test

Wednesday May 22 2019


Bomb blast hits tourist bus near Egypt pyramids

Monday May 20 2019

 

AFP
By AFP
More by this Author

Cairo. A bomb blast hit a tourist bus near Egypt's famed Giza pyramids on Sunday, wounding some of them, including South Africans, in the latest blow to the country's tourism industry.

The roadside bomb went off as the bus was being driven in Giza, also causing injuries to Egyptians in a nearby car, medical and security sources said.

Security and medical sources in Egypt said 17 people were injured, without giving a breakdown of their nationalities. No deaths were reported.

South Africa said in a statement that the "bus explosion" injured three of its 28 citizens who were part of the tourist group.

They would remain in hospital while the rest would return home on Monday, said the statement from the department of international relations.

"A device exploded and smashed the windows of a bus carrying 25 people from South Africa and a private car carrying four Egyptians," the security source said.

Advertisement

Video footage captured by AFP showed the bus and car with broken windows on the side of the road.

According to the security source, the wounded were being treated for scratches caused by the broken glass.

Sunday's incident comes after three Vietnamese holidaymakers and their Egyptian guide were killed when a roadside bomb hit their bus as it travelled near the Giza pyramids outside Cairo in December.

It also comes just little more than a month before the African Cup of Nations hosted by Egypt is to kick off.

Egypt has been battling an insurgency that surged especially in the turbulent North Sinai region following the 2013 military ouster of Islamist president Mohamed Morsi, who was replaced by former army general Abdel Fattah al-Sisi.

In February 2018, the army launched a nationwide operation against militants, focusing mainly on the North Sinai region.

- Tourism recovery -

Some 650 militants and around 45 soldiers have been killed since the start of the offensive, according to separate statements by the armed forces.

Since first being elected in 2014, Sisi has presented himself as a bulwark against terrorism, promising stability and increased security.

Recently, the country's vital tourism industry has started to slowly rebound after suffering strong blows due to deadly attacks targeting tourists following the turmoil of the 2011 uprising that toppled longtime ruler Hosni Mubarak.

Figures by the official statistics agency showed that tourist arrivals reached 8.3 million in 2017, compared with 5.3 million the previous year.

Authorities have gone at great lengths to lure tourists back, touting a series of archaeological finds and a new museum next to the pyramids, as well as enhanced security at airports and around ancient sites.

But that figure was still far short of the record influx of 2010 when more than 14 million visitors flocked to see the country's sites


Ukraine's new president Zelensky calls snap elections

Monday May 20 2019

 

Kiev. Ukraine's new President Volodymyr Zelensky used his inaugural speech Monday to call snap parliamentary polls after shooting to power in a country wracked by a separatist conflict and severe economic problems.

The 41-year-old comedian was sworn in as Ukraine's youngest post-Soviet president a month after scoring a landslide victory over Petro Poroshenko with a campaign capitalising on widespread public discontent with the political establishment.

Zelensky -- whose only previous political experience is appearing as president in a popular TV show -- announced his first priority was ending the five-year conflict with Moscow-backed separatists in the industrial east that has claimed over 13,000 lives.

"Our first task is a ceasefire in the Donbass," Zelensky said during the ceremony in parliament, referring to the eastern separatist-controlled region, prompting a round of applause.

"We didn't start this war but it is up to us to end it," he said.

"We are ready for dialogue," he added, urging the handover of Ukrainian prisoners.

Advertisement

- 'They are ours' -

He reiterated Ukraine does not recognise Russia's 2014 annexation of Crimea nor the separatists' self-proclaimed republics.

"Our next challenge is the return of the lost territories," he said.

Switching to Russian in an emotive speech, he stressed that Ukraine must regain the hearts and minds of Russian-speaking people living there, who "are not strangers, they are ours, Ukrainians".

Zelensky announced he would dissolve parliament in order to call early elections which had originally been scheduled for October.

"People must come to power who will serve the public," Zelensky said, after wrangling with hostile lawmakers whom he has called "petty crooks".

Zelensky's move could be seen as breaching Ukraine's complex legislation but is likely to go ahead, political analysts said.

"It will be easier for Zelensky to dissolve parliament than to keep his high rating," analyst Mykola Davydchuk said. "There are no mechanisms or instruments to stop this decision."

- High fives and selfies -

Zelensky also called for the sacking of the head of the state security service, prosecutor-general and defence minister loyal to his predecessor, although this has to be approved by parliament.

Defence Minister Stepan Poltorak and the head of the SBU security service Vasyl Grytsak tendered their resignations on Monday.

Zelensky took a non-traditional route to his inauguration -- walking from his nearby home, after saying he wanted a less pompous ceremony.

Dressed in a dark suit, he exchanged high fives with supporters waiting outside, took selfies with them and even jumped up to plant a kiss on a supporter's forehead.

In his speech, Zelensky referred to his background as a comedian. "In my life, I've tried to do all I could to make Ukrainians smile," he said.

"In the next five years I'll do all I can so that Ukrainians don't cry."

Uniquely for a first-time president, Zelensky has played the role before -- for laughs. He starred as a history teacher who was unexpectedly elected president in a television comedy series, "Servant of the People".

And his newly-formed party is named "Servant of the People".

When the actor and comedian announced his candidacy in December, few took it seriously, but after a campaign largely waged through social media, he won more than 73 percent in the second round on April 21 against Poroshenko.

Poroshenko led Ukraine for five years, overseeing the fallout over the Crimea annexation and the conflict in the east.

Although he launched some reforms, he was criticised for failing to improve living standards or effectively fight corruption.

Zelensky has vowed to continue the country's pro-Western course but critics may question how he will deal with the enormous challenges of the separatist conflict and ongoing economic problems.

The separatist authorities have indicated that they could be ready to negotiate with Zelensky.

Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov on Monday said President Vladimir Putin has no plans to meet with Zelensky and would not be congratulating him on his inauguration.

The Russian president will only "congratulate him on the first successes" in resolving the separatist conflict, he said, calling it a "domestic problem" for Ukraine.

Kiev and its allies accuse Moscow of militarily supporting the separatists, which it denies.

But earlier this month, Putin this month ordered an easing of procedures for Ukrainians living in the separatist regions to gain Russian passports, a move that caused uproar in Kiev.


Modi party confident of new India election victory

Monday May 20 2019

AFP
By AFP
More by this Author


Boeing acknowledges flaw in 737 MAX simulator software

Sunday May 19 2019

 

AFP
By AFP
More by this Author


India's acrimonious election comes to an end

Sunday May 19 2019

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi is showered

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi is showered with petals during a campaign stop 

AFP
By AFP
More by this Author


Netherlands wins Eurovision as Madonna dancers spark flag controversy

Sunday May 19 2019

 

AFP
By AFP
More by this Author


'Ibiza affair' topples Austrian government, snap election announced

Sunday May 19 2019

 

AFP
By AFP
More by this Author


After the Moon, people on Mars by 2033...or 2060

Saturday May 18 2019

New surface features (outlined) of the Moon,

New surface features (outlined) of the Moon, discovered in a region called Mare Frigoris. The US President signed a directive ordering NASA to prepare to return astronauts to the Moon. PHOTO | AFP | NASA  

AFP
By AFP
More by this Author


Vatican priest cleared of trying to kiss nun

Friday May 17 2019

AFP Agency
By AFP Agency
More by this Author


Taiwan becomes first Asian country to approve same-sex marriage

Friday May 17 2019

 

AFP Agency
By AFP Agency
More by this Author


Pregnant US teen killed, baby taken from womb

Friday May 17 2019

AFP
By AFP
More by this Author


Allegri and Juventus in surprise split at end of season

Friday May 17 2019

 

AFP Agency
By AFP Agency
More by this Author


Elton John biopic 'Rocketman' blows Cannes away

Friday May 17 2019

 

AFP
By AFP
More by this Author


Social media remains shut in Eritrea

Friday May 17 2019

 

By NMG


Huawei becomes flashpoint in China-US economic showdown

Friday May 17 2019

 

AFP
By AFP
More by this Author


Boeing seeks regulators' permission after 737 MAX software update is complete

Friday May 17 2019

 

AFP
By AFP
More by this Author