Aga Khan opens one-stop centre

Friday December 18 2020
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By Alfred Zacharia

Dar es Salaam. The Aga Khan Hospital has established a single stop clinic which provides all necessary treatment and awareness creation about diabetes in one centre.

According to the hospital’s internal medicine physician Samina Somji, patients will get all necessary services at the centre and save cost and time. “The patients meet a physician, dietician, diabetes educator, an ophthalmologist and also get tests in that single clinic. This saves costs and time,” he said in a press statement.

“Patients are also put on a structured approach to regularly follow-up that also includes assessing for complications including kidney, eye and heart check-ups for prevention of serious complications which are in line with the national non-communicable diseases strategic plan of 2016-2020,” he added.

At the hospital, Dr Somji said the nurses undergo in-house training from screening, prevention and early detection of diabetes, promoting self-care, nutrition, oral/injectable therapies and handling of glycemic emergencies.

“These nurses spend ample time to monitor and educate patients on diabetes management in both the outpatient and inpatient settings,” he said.

He also advised Tanzanians to have a habit of undertaking regular check-ups because the majority of people are victims of diabetes but they are not aware.

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Latest statistics show that currently, one in two (50.1 percent) people living with diabetes do not know that they diabetic.

“Early detection and prevention of diabetes is the key to avoid this dreadful disease and its complications. The disease is preventable and also manageable. Seek expert advice earlier to live a quality life,” he noted.

According to him, management involves medications and lifestyle changes which includes healthy diet and regular exercise.

Diabetes is a major health issue that has reached alarming levels. In 2019, nearly half a billion people (9.3 percent of adults between ages of 20–79 years) were living with diabetes worldwide.