INVEST MORE IN ICT FOR THE SAKE OF EDUCATION

Summary

  • Technology is the driver of educational transformation in many developing countries. However, the transition has seen many false dawns, especially in developing countries such as Tanzania.

Technology is changing many important functions in modern society. That is why education policies and practices need to keep pace with technological advancement.

Technology is the driver of educational transformation in many developing countries. However, the transition has seen many false dawns, especially in developing countries such as Tanzania.

Needless to say, information and communication technology (ICT) is inevitable in education and other key sectors.

There is no going against the flow even though some pessimists still doubt ICT use in schools.

The internet today provides access to a wealth of learning resources, which make it easier for teachers to get the content they need.

Granted, there is the challenge of identifying relevant resources, which many teaching staff struggle with, but this just calls for proper training.

Education minister Adolf Mkenda has yet again stressed more investment in ICT in higher learning institutions to avoid disruption of learning whenever diseases and other calamities happen. A case in point is the global Covid-19 pandemic, which led to the closure of schools and higher learning institutions for several months in 2020.

His call is welcome, but more ICT investment should be at all levels of education. This will, indeed, help thousands of learners across the country.

The government is doing a commendable job in transforming education through ICT, but there is a need to catch up with technology and other countries.

There are many pupils who hardly see a teacher in some parts of the country, so increased investment in ICT can boost learning in such places since ICT helps to expand access to education. Learning can occur anytime and anywhere through ICT.

ICT includes computers, internet, and electronic delivery systems such as radios, televisions and projectors, among others.

For instance, teleconferencing classrooms allow learners and teachers to interact simultaneously with ease and convenience. It may be expensive, but that is the way to go.

There is also a need to realign curricula more closely with the country’s needs, with new technologies firmly in mind.


LET’S TREAT THE ELDERLY WELL

Do senior citizens in Tanzania get the respect they deserve in hospitals, public offices, or public transport? This is a very pertinent question because it is not unusual for nurses and other insolent healthcare workers to insult elders who are old enough to be their grandparents.

In public transport, it is now the norm for young folk to remain glued to their seats even when they see elderly people standing, barely able to maintain their balance, courtesy of the reckless driving that is synonymous with daladalas.

There are also reports of incapacitated elderly people being routinely neglected and abused at homes and in hospitals. All this should be food for thought.

There is also the issue of brutality, and perhaps the most damning evidence is the murder of elderly women with red eyes in some parts of the country. Such women are brutally killed, particularly in Mwanza, Shinyanga and Tabora regions, on suspicion of being witches, which is ludicrous, of course.