Tuesday, April 17, 2018

Ask Teacher Owere: How do I help my 9-year-old son to attain good grades?

 

Hi, I am a parent of a nine-year-old boy who is now in his third grade. However, I have realised that the more he goes up the more his learning becomes difficult especially when put together with others. His teachers say he will improve but as far as I am concerned, time is not on our side. Under the circumstances I find myself at a loss of what to do?

Every child needs love, encouragement, and support, and for kids with learning disabilities, such positive reinforcement can help ensure that they emerge with a strong sense of self-worth, confidence, and the determination to keep going even when things are tough.

In searching for ways to help children with learning disabilities, remember that you are looking for ways to help them help themselves.

Your job as a parent is not to “cure” the learning disability, but to give your child the social and emotional tools he or she needs to work through challenges.

In the long run, facing and overcoming a challenge such as a learning disability can help your child grow stronger and more resilient.

Always remember that the way you behave and respond to challenges has a big impact on your child.

A good attitude won’t solve the problems associated with a learning disability, but it can give your child hope and confidence that things can improve and that he or she will eventually succeed.

Remind yourself that everyone faces obstacles. It’s up to you as a parent to teach your child how to deal with those obstacles without becoming discouraged or overwhelmed. Don’t let the tests, school bureaucracy, and endless paperwork distract you from what’s really important—giving your child plenty of emotional and moral support.

Do your own research and keep abreast of new developments in learning disability programs, therapies, and educational techniques. You may be tempted to look to others—teachers, therapists, doctors—for solutions, especially at first. But you’re the foremost expert on your child, so take charge when it comes to finding the tools he or she needs in order to learn.

get special help for your child. Embrace your role as a proactive parent and work on your communication skills.

It may be frustrating at times, but by remaining calm and reasonable, yet firm, you can make a huge difference for your child.

Your child will follow your lead. If you approach learning challenges with optimism, hard work, and a sense of humor, your child is likely to embrace your perspective—or at least see the challenges as a speed bump, rather than a roadblock.

Focus your energy on learning what works for your child and implementing it the best you can.

It’s only natural to want the best for your child but academic success, while important, isn’t the end goal. What you really want for your child is a happy and fulfilling life.

With encouragement and the right support, your child can build a strong sense of self-confidence and a solid foundation for lifelong success.

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