Tanzania loses over 16,000 people annually to boda boda accidents

Summary

  • Research findings show that motorcycle riders face a higher risk of severe injury, morbidity, and mortality than other road users.

Dar es Salaam. Tanzanian boda-boda (motorcycle) riders have been urged to remain vigilant in preventing road deaths and serious injuries in order to meet United Nations (UN) targets of reducing road traffic deaths by at least 50% by 2030.

Data shows Tanzania loses over 16, 000 people annually, and boda boda-related accidents account for the majority of road traffic injuries.

As a result, it is important to provide regular education and awareness to motorists on their role and responsibility in preventing traffic accidents, says assistant inspector of police Fabian Makolo from the central police station in Dar es Salaam.

Mr Makolo partnered with the local manufacturers and assemblers of motorised three-wheelers and motorcycles, the MeTL Group-Bajaj, to provide an awareness seminar to bodaboda riders in the city in commemoration of the nation’s road safety week.

“There are five key pillars that every good driver must know, and those are responsibility, concentration, anticipation, patience, and confidence,” he said. “In addition to putting your life at risk, it has a detrimental effect on your economic well-being because if you are permanently injured, you find it difficult to provide for your family,” said Mr Makolo.

Research findings show that motorcycle riders face a higher risk of severe injury, morbidity, and mortality than other road users.

“It is one of the most dangerous and difficult jobs to be employed in, so safety is paramount,” he said.

Earlier this year, former chief medical officer Dr. Aifelo Sichwale stated in Tanzania that 10 out of every 100 patients treated in hospital emergency departments are usually accident victims, with boda boda and auto rickshaw (tuktuk) accidents accounting for up to 77 percent of the cases.

”About 71.3 percent of road accident victims who end up in hospitals are men.” “Most of them are between 19 and 37,” Dr Sichwale is quoted as having told The Citizen in April.