Barclays unveils heath access for children

Barclays Bank Tanzania head of collection and recoveries Khatibu Mohammedy hands over a medical insurance card to Joy Jacob when the bank donated medical insurance cards to 200 children in Dar es Salaam. PHOTO | COURTESY

Summary

Speaking during the announcement, the Barclays Head of Collections and Recoveries, Mr Khatibu Mohammedy, said “We are aware that, many Tanzanian children who are suffering from hydrocephalus and Spina Bifida medical condition are facing an uphill financial struggle due to the fact that they do not have medical coverage.

Dar es Salaam. Barclays Bank Tanzania Limited provides access to health care for children with hydrocephalus and Spina Bifida at Muhimbili Orthopaedic Institute (MOI). Barclays, through its citizenship pillar promises to make a positive impact in the community in which it operates through strategic initiatives. Speaking during the announcement, the Barclays Head of Collections and Recoveries, Mr Khatibu Mohammedy, said “We are aware that, many Tanzanian children who are suffering from hydrocephalus and Spina Bifida medical condition are facing an uphill financial struggle due to the fact that they do not have medical coverage.

To treat the medical condition requires surgical intervention which is costly for most of the families in Tanzania.”

He said Barclays has decided to offer 75 children affected with this condition access to free medical insurance coverage through the National Health Insurance Fund (NHIF) by paying all the costs pertaining to the insurance coverage.

He added, “Doctors and other health personnel work as hard as they can to supply the best care available, but often, it’s not enough. In considering this, the bank, through its employees has decided to donate blood for the blood bank of the hospital, supply five hydrocephalus shunt machines and supply one wheel chair.

Furthermore, the bank plans to finance a camp for Hydrocephalus and Spina Bifida Medical Specialist at MOI and other medical assistance to operate on 30 children affected with this condition”.